Integrative Medicine Blog

Point of the Month: Kidney 3

Liza Pollock L.Ac, M.Ac.O.M. Saturday, March 10, 2018
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According to Chinese medicine, winter corresponds to the Kidney and Bladder organs, which correspond to the ears, bones, low back, knees, hair on the head, to storing, and to fear as well as courage.

As we enter the month of March we begin to transition from winter into spring. Some of the oldest Chinese medical texts suggested thousands of years ago that humans should live in harmony with the natural cycle of the seasons. Winter is the time to honor slowing and quieting down, to reflect inwardly, and to rest and conserve energy so that we may be replenished and recharged instead of burned out when the spring returns. Just as the leaves fall off the trees and the roots store the essential nutrients needed for re-growth in the spring, we can shed unwanted layers, getting rid of that which does not serve us anymore, while grounding into and cultivating the positive and healthy aspects of our being. During this time of introspection and consolidation, it is important that we recharge our batteries and cultivate personal practices of a healthy diet, exercise, and getting enough sleep and relaxation.

According to Chinese medicine, winter corresponds to the Kidney and Bladder organs, which correspond to the ears, bones, low back, knees, hair on the head, to storing, and to fear as well as courage. The Kidneys are considered the “root of life” and store our source Qi, our most dense core strength and will-power. They are said to govern reproduction, growth and development and control water and fluids. The kidneys support all of the other organs in the body so their healthy functioning is vitally important. One example is that the kidneys help anchor down the pure air we breathe in through the lungs, so sometimes respiratory issues must also be also treated through the kidneys.

The kidney channel starts on the bottom of the foot and travels up the inside of the ankle, up the inside of the leg, and up both sides of the midline of the abdomen and chest ending under the collar bones. Each channel has what’s called a source point that is said to directly affect that organ. On the kidney channel this is kidney 3 called Tai Xi, which translates to ‘supreme stream.’ It is located on the inside of the ankle in the depression between the high point of the ankle bone and the achilles tendon. This point is used for low back pain, tinnitus (ringing of the ears), sore throat, cough and wheezing, insomnia, impotence, frequent urination, and more. If you rub this area with gentle pressure you will be nourishing your kidney Qi, strengthening your body’s vitality and increasing your longevity.

Resources:

A Manual of Acupuncture by Peter Deadman

The Foundations of Chinese Medicine by Giovanni Maciocia

The Web That Has No Weaver by Ted Kaptchuk, O.M.D.

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